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ULTRANS aims to support the design and implementation of new land use and vehicle demand policies through research, education, and public outreach. The Center’s results-oriented research illuminates the relationship between land use, transportation, and the environment. Models, methods, and evidence developed at ULTRANS will support the development of policies that encourage sustainable cities and regions.

ULTRANS will help train the next generation of leaders in urban research and policy development. Affiliated students have opportunities to participate in research and outreach on critical issues in addressing climate change.

About ULTRANS

As the world’s cities and regions struggle to enhance economic development, social equity, and environmental quality while meeting the infrastructure demands of a growing population, they sorely need tools that contemplate the effects of transportation and land use policies. The UC Davis Urban Land Use and Transportation Center (ULTRANS) improves understanding of these relationships and develops, tests, and deploys tools that can be used for planning.

Our focus is on the development of policies and tools to be used in California to support state requirements for reduced greenhouse gas emissions in metropolitan areas. Our efforts build upon the internationally recognized work at ITS-Davis and affiliated departments and centers on campus, and include collaborations with ITS organizations throughout the University of California system. Supporting the design and implementation of new land use and vehicle demand policies is our aim - through research, education, and public outreach. The Center’s results-oriented research illuminates how the interactions of land use, transportation, the economy and the environment can encourage sustainability.

ULTRANS is training the next generation of leaders in urban research and policy development. Affiliated students have opportunities to participate in graduate level coursework, as well as research and outreach on critical issues in addressing climate change.

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