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Integrated Urban Modeling in Support of Environmental Justice and Sustainable Communities Planning in California

Summary: 
Paper #11-3803 For presentation at the TRB Annual Meeting -- January 23-27, 2011
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Completed

Since the Civil Rights Act of 1964, attention increasingly has been focused on social justice issues, mainly human health and access to services. With the Clinton executive order in 1994, Federal agencies were mandated to avoid disproportionate adverse environmental impacts to minority and low-income populations, in all agency actions, including both plans and projects. Subsequent USDOT rules expanded this order to include all social and economic impacts in transportation planning and project funding. Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) are the most-relevant agencies, in terms of this type of equity analysis, and generally have not used their existing modeling tools to project plan or project impacts on protected groups in any detail. We will use California as a case study, because a recent State law requires the State's 18 MPOs to adopt Sustainable Communities Strategies to reduce greenhouse gases in their Regional Transportation Plans, starting in 2012. This law requires certain environmental justice analyses and also substantial improvements in MPO modeling capabilities. California's largest four MPOs are developing improved travel models and land use models. We evaluate if these improved models will be capable of evaluating the equity effects of regional plans.

Lifestyle clusters for labor force participation, occupation and housing use in integrated land use and transportation modeling

Summary: 
Presented at the 12th International Conference on Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management
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Completed

The California statewide integrated land use and transportation modeling has being developed using the PECAS framework. This paper focus on two goals: a) presenting a framework for identifying household lifestyle clusters, and b) applying them to a spatial economic model system. A household's lifestyle is defined by two sets of dimensions: space use and household wage. Using a two-step clustering algorithm, different household lifestyle clusters were identified. The applicability of these lifestyle clusters for a integrated land use and transportation model was explored.

Simplified Model of Local Transit Services

Summary: 
Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting 2011 Paper #11-0813
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Completed

The California Statewide Travel Demand Modeling (CSTDM) Framework is a comprehensive model system designed and developed for use in transportation policy analysis and forecasting. It includes representation of all major components of both long and short distance transportation covering the entire state. A novel hybrid system is used to represent the full range of rail and bus transit services that are available. Rail and fixed busway services – including all long-distance rail, commuter rail, light rail transit (LRT) and busway services – are represented in the standard manner, using explicit node and link networks, and the relevant in-vehicle and out-of-vehicle service characteristics for journeys are determined as standard skims of these networks. On-street bus services are not represented using explicit networks; rather, the relevant in-vehicle and out-of-vehicle service characteristics for journeys are determined using functions of other transportation network variables, land use descriptors and relevant policy indicators. These functions are simplified econometric models that have been estimated using observations of transit service obtained from Transit Data Feeds available on the Google platform. The network and simplified components are integrated in order to allow transit paths with both rail and on-street bus components to be considered by the various travel choice models included in the Framework.

The Use of Traffic Count Databases in the Validation Process of the California Statewide Travel Demand Model - CUPUM Paper 2011

Summary: 
Peer reviewed paper accepted at the 2011 Conference on Computeres in Urban Planning and Urban Managment
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Creative Commons - Commercial Use OK
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Completed

The California Statewide Travel Demand Modeling (CSTDM) Framework is a comprehensive model system designed and developed for use in transportation policy analysis and forecasting. It includes representation of all major components of both long and short distance transportation covering the entire state. This paper discusses the strategy used for the validation of the CSTDM. The process is based on the comparison of the model forecasts for traffic volumes on the California highway network with observed traffic data. As part of this process, we identified the most relevant screenlines on which to evaluate interregional traffic flows and to assess the accuracy of the model forecasts on the main intercity travel corridors. The validation strategy involved the use of traffic counts data from multiple sources. A comprehensive database on interregional traffic volumes was built using data from both the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) Transportation System Information (TSI) database and the Performance Measurement System (PeMS).

Los Angeles City Profile - Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Local Government Action

Summary: 
A part of the study entitled: Reducing greenhouse gas emissions through local government action: Case studies of eight California cities - 12/2010
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Creative Commons - Non-Commercial
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Planned

Berkeley City Profile - Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Local Government Action

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A part of the study entitled: Reducing greenhouse gas emissions through local government action: Case studies of eight California cities - January, 2011
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Ongoing

CalSIM Supports California Policy

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CalSIM provides a unified coordination platform for various California State agencies to share assumptions and data and weigh important policy and investment decisions pertaining to infrastructure investment, climate change, mitigation/adaptation, public health, energy efficiency, and resource management in a coordinated and efficient fashion.
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Planned

Equity Analysis of Land Use and Transport Plans Using an Integrated Spatial Model

Summary: 
This report describes a study to investigate how the Sacramento PECAS model was applied to evaluate the equity effects of land use and transport policies intended to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Activity Allocation (AA) Module of the PECAS (Production, Exchange, andConsumption Allocation) Model for the Sacramento region is used to simulate two future scenarios arising from a recent regional visioning planning process, which was conducted to cope with an estimated doubling of the regional population by the year 2050. The ‘Preferred Blueprint’ plan articulates levels and locations of redevelopment and new transit-oriented development linked to a list of preferred transport projects. The ‘Business-As-Usual’ plan continues previous land use and transport trends, and leads to a larger area of urban coverage and lower development densities.
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Creative Commons - Non-Commercial
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Completed
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